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David and Goliath
Wooden: A Coach's Life



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Will's books

The Silent Man
5 of 5 stars
Another great John Wells book. I previously compared Alex Berenson and his hero, John Wells, with Vince Flynn and his troubled CIA agent/assassin, Mitch Rapp. Towards the end of Flynn's short life and in his final Rapp books, Flynn got a...
tagged: fiction and troubled-assassin
Getting Started with Hobby Quadcopters and Drones
2 of 5 stars
When I was looking up reviews of drones on the web, I found several mentions of this "book" (a pamphlet,really). It's OK,but all the information can be easily found elsewhere online. The repeated warning about crashing your drone and sta...
tagged: non-fiction
The Martian
5 of 5 stars
Wow. Just . . . wow. This was one of the most entertaining books I have read in a long time. The story is fabulous and the execution wonderful. Basically a diary of an astronaut left behind in an escape from a failed Mars mission (though...
tagged: fiction
The Target
2 of 5 stars
I can't even begin to imagine why this book has gotten good reviews. I have read and enjoyed Baldacci's books before, but this is the first book in the Will Robie series that I've read. Probably the last as well. It's the third one of t...
tagged: fiction and troubled-assassin
David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants
3 of 5 stars
I didn't love this book. While I generally like Gladwell's style and analysis, he seems to be running out of interesting observations or topics to cover. There are a few good tidbits and the book is short. If you love Gladwell, it's wor...
tagged: non-fiction
Anthem
4 of 5 stars
I love Ayn Rand's thought-provoking books and stories. I'm fundamentally aligned with her libertarian way of thinking so, for the most part, her stories are just one's that drive home a point that I already agree with or, at least, under...
tagged: fiction
Thinking, Fast and Slow
5 of 5 stars
This is simply a fabulous book about how the mind works and how our behavior is driven by our levels of thought. It's not a terribly difficult book to get through, although it does require a lot of System 2 thinking - Kahneman's term for...
tagged: non-fiction
Killing Jesus: A History
4 of 5 stars
As with the other "killing" books by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard, I really don't like the positioning that the book is based entirely on fact - insinuating the other crappy books I've read are made up. In the documenting of Jesus' li...
tagged: non-fiction
Wooden: A Coach's Life
4 of 5 stars
How can one not like a book about John Wooden? The man is a sports icon. Most of all, of course, he's a teacher, which is exactly what he wanted to be and prided himself on. He based his entire life on teaching basketball fundamentals an...
tagged: non-fiction and sports
Dead Eye
5 of 5 stars
Wow. Just. Wow. This is a great book. In the ex-CIA-troubled-assassin genre, this may be my favorite book ever. Greaney does a fabulous job of balancing action with storyline. Never gets boring, but the reader is overwhelmed by ridiculou...
tagged: fiction and troubled-assassin

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Cannibalize Yourself

I recently read a story about how Volkswagen is considering NOT bringing the upcoming Scirocco (an updated version of their 80′s hatchback sports coupe) to the US market because it might take market share from their currently offered GTI hatchback.  While this may be an excuse masking other reasons for such a decision, if it is the real deal, it seems patently absurd to me.  Like any company, Volkswagen should be worried about how its competitors are planning to take market share away from them, not whether or not they will do it to themselves.  If you create better products for a market you serve you should use them to expand or, at least, solidify your position in the segment, not hold them back until your competition introduces product that threatens your position.  This is even true if you already are the leader in the segment.

I believe that if the new product is 100% of an overlap with an existing product and does nothing to expand the product’s market (this includes the case where there’s minimal expansion), then the original product should be replaced by the new one.  If there is overlap, with each product covering segments not addressed by the other, then keep both products and direct customers to your entire product offering regardless of their specific preferences – because you cover them with the breadth of your products.  Never wait.

Your market is full of competition, even if you don’t see it, it’s there, lurking in the shadows waiting to attack.  To make things worse, with almost no barriers to entry in any market these days (including capital equipment), a new competitor can spring up overnight.  Only by being aggressive – rolling out constant improvements and new, replacement products – can you retain or grow your market share and keep competitors at bay.  Always play offense.

Someone is always working to knock your products and services off their market perch.  To maximize your success, that should always be you.  Your biggest competitor should be . . . you.

  • Dave

    It seems like the question of whether to retain an older product, even when the new one is not 100% overlapping, is not as simple as just retaining all the customers. There are issues of product confusion and message dilution as well. This doesn’t really affect your main point, that they shouldn’t delay bringing on the NEW product in any case.

  • Dave

    It seems like the question of whether to retain an older product, even when the new one is not 100% overlapping, is not as simple as just retaining all the customers. There are issues of product confusion and message dilution as well. This doesn’t really affect your main point, that they shouldn’t delay bringing on the NEW product in any case.

  • http://www.2-speed.com/ Will

    Agreed. Simplified for sure, but as you say, the point still remains. Fix the confusion and keep moving forward.

  • http://www.2-speed.com Will

    Agreed. Simplified for sure, but as you say, the point still remains. Fix the confusion and keep moving forward.

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