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May
10

Leadership is a Public Act

The title of this post is a quote from the latest entry on Will Price’s blog, Leaders as Weather Vanes.  In his post, Will discusses a 1915 quote from the President of National City Bank of NY (Citibank), Charles Mitchell, that he read in the recent 70th anniversary edition of Forbes.

Will goes on to say:

A vital lesson for developing leaders is that leadership is a public act. The gestures, facial expressions, and postures of leaders project across the whole organization.”

More true words are rarely spoken.  Check out the rest of the post on Will’s blog.

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 May 10th, 2007  
 Will  
 Leadership  
   
 6 Comments

6 Responses to Leadership is a Public Act

  1. Of course, if you agree with this you can’t complain when all our politicians are actors and litigators. Those are the professions where one learns to have the right gesture or facial expression and have people believe it – even if not sincere.

  2. Of course, if you agree with this you can’t complain when all our politicians are actors and litigators. Those are the professions where one learns to have the right gesture or facial expression and have people believe it – even if not sincere.

  3. Well actors, yes, but not necessarily litigators. Litigation implies a legal contest. Leadership as described here, is independent of any legal connection.

    Leadership involves a certain amount of acting. I wouldn’t expect politicians to be any different. At least not the ones who are good leaders. Acting is in some sense lying, of course, so I draw some line between where the acting ends and the complete distortion of the truth begins.

    It depends on what “is” means, after all.

  4. Well actors, yes, but not necessarily litigators. Litigation implies a legal contest. Leadership as described here, is independent of any legal connection.

    Leadership involves a certain amount of acting. I wouldn’t expect politicians to be any different. At least not the ones who are good leaders. Acting is in some sense lying, of course, so I draw some line between where the acting ends and the complete distortion of the truth begins.

    It depends on what “is” means, after all.

  5. I include litigators not because it has anything to do with the law, but because they (good ones, at least) are skilled at providing just the right facial expression or tone of voice to get the desired response from the jury.

  6. I include litigators not because it has anything to do with the law, but because they (good ones, at least) are skilled at providing just the right facial expression or tone of voice to get the desired response from the jury.

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