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Will's books

Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town
3 of 5 stars
The story of Bassett furniture and John Bassett III in particular is a great one that should be told. Beth Macy does a reasonable job telling it, but spends much too much time discussing her challenges and experiences writing the book as...
The Silent Man
5 of 5 stars
Another great John Wells book. I previously compared Alex Berenson and his hero, John Wells, with Vince Flynn and his troubled CIA agent/assassin, Mitch Rapp. Towards the end of Flynn's short life and in his final Rapp books, Flynn got a...
Getting Started with Hobby Quadcopters and Drones
2 of 5 stars
When I was looking up reviews of drones on the web, I found several mentions of this "book" (a pamphlet,really). It's OK,but all the information can be easily found elsewhere online. The repeated warning about crashing your drone and sta...
The Martian
5 of 5 stars
Wow. Just . . . wow. This was one of the most entertaining books I have read in a long time. The story is fabulous and the execution wonderful. Basically a diary of an astronaut left behind in an escape from a failed Mars mission (though...
The Ghost War
5 of 5 stars
I've read a few other of Berenson's John Wells books before and found them entertaining,although not up to the standard set by Vince Flynn and his hero, Mitch Rapp. Sadly, Flynn passed away and having finished all the Mitch Rapp books, I...

Checkin’ Out Photosynth

When I saw the coming out demo of Microsoft’s Photosynth technology done at the TED Conference over a year ago, I was totally blown away.

Photosynth automatically assembles a set of individual photos of a particular subject into a three dimensional, explorable universe of the scene. The more photos, the more detail and the more explorable the final “synth.”  It differs from stitching – the process of aligning and joining several overlapping photos to create a single larger image – in that the resulting image is a space rather than a flat 2D image.

When the public beta was introduced a couple of months ago, I was all over it.  I played with other people’s synths and was impressed.  But, of course, I had to give it a go myself.  I decided to throw what I thought would be a difficult scene at it – one with trees.  Trees always give stitching programs fits and, as it turns out, they do the same for Photosynth.  There are just a whole lot of edges to align.

I took 144 photos of a location (you don’t need to take that many, but I wanted to see how complete a scene I could create) from every angle I could get to.  Photosynth cranked on the photos for a while and broke the scene into many different views.  There should have only been one, but the program couldn’t match up the views to form a single synth.  The results are below.

Photosynth reported that my 144 photos were only 23% “synthy.”  Basically, Photosynth could only make heads or tails of 23% of my photos in creating the final synth.  If you look at the synths on the web site, you’ll find excellent ones that are >90% synthy like The Boxer.

The user interface for creating synths is very simple and the program creates synths with virtually no user intervention.  Exploring synths is a different matter.  The browser interface is a bit strange to me.  I’m never sure what the arrows and buttons are supposed to do, even after trying them.  I may be using it to its fullest, but I may be missing the point entirely.  A few more tooltips might be helpful.

You need to download the Synther, which runs on your PC (no Mac support yet).  The Synther will upload the synth to servers in the cloud.  You’ll need a Microsoft Live ID to use the service.  For now, all uploaded synths are public.  Everything is free.

I think this technology has tremendous promise and I plan on playing with it a lot more.  Of course, I’ll report back on my findings.  In the mean time, you may want to give it a try.  It’s easy and very cool.

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  • john bower

    Will,

    So I first saw this on DPReview and gave it a quick look, then I believe you mentioned once to me.

    I think some of the navigational confusion comes from thinking this is a type of photogrammetric program. One that remaps the pixel information onto 3D surfaces and results in essentially a single texture mapped 3D surface file.

    In fact this appears to something more and less than that. In essence, the program appears to create a series of hyperlink tags that contain the 3D location and orientation of each of the images in a synth group. The synth viewer is the interface through which one navigates these hyperlinked files.

    Instead of an underlined set of text to indicate a hyperlink, a ghostly trapezoid outline appears indicating another image file that shares common spatial information with the image that is front and center. If another image is a complete subset of the present image, e.g. a close-up view, you can access that information by either clicking within the outline or merely zooming in.

    What is quite fascinating is its paradigm for categorizing and accessing huge amounts of visual data. That and the essentially automatic process to do the categorizing.

    This is also the first significant use I’ve seen of the jpeg2000 file format. Which also shows its great potential.

    John

  • john bower

    Will,

    So I first saw this on DPReview and gave it a quick look, then I believe you mentioned once to me.

    I think some of the navigational confusion comes from thinking this is a type of photogrammetric program. One that remaps the pixel information onto 3D surfaces and results in essentially a single texture mapped 3D surface file.

    In fact this appears to something more and less than that. In essence, the program appears to create a series of hyperlink tags that contain the 3D location and orientation of each of the images in a synth group. The synth viewer is the interface through which one navigates these hyperlinked files.

    Instead of an underlined set of text to indicate a hyperlink, a ghostly trapezoid outline appears indicating another image file that shares common spatial information with the image that is front and center. If another image is a complete subset of the present image, e.g. a close-up view, you can access that information by either clicking within the outline or merely zooming in.

    What is quite fascinating is its paradigm for categorizing and accessing huge amounts of visual data. That and the essentially automatic process to do the categorizing.

    This is also the first significant use I’ve seen of the jpeg2000 file format. Which also shows its great potential.

    John

  • http://www.2-speed.com/ Will

    John,

    That’s a great description of how the UI works and that’s how I understand it, too. I guess my problem with the UI is not so much that I don’t understand it, but more that I think it could be better or, at least, more intuitive. I can see it turning many people off.

    I agree that there’s tremendous power here. I just think that Microsoft could make it more accessible or, at least, less intimidating.

    I didn’t realize that they were using JPEG2000. Cool.

  • http://www.2-speed.com Will

    John,

    That’s a great description of how the UI works and that’s how I understand it, too. I guess my problem with the UI is not so much that I don’t understand it, but more that I think it could be better or, at least, more intuitive. I can see it turning many people off.

    I agree that there’s tremendous power here. I just think that Microsoft could make it more accessible or, at least, less intimidating.

    I didn’t realize that they were using JPEG2000. Cool.